The Business Case for Sensing – How to be Ready

LpS 2018 - Lighting Business Trends
25 Sep 2018
17:00-17:30
Seestudio

The Business Case for Sensing – How to be Ready

There is little argument that lighting is well positioned to serve as the sensing backbone for the IoT in our built spaces. From there, the crystal ball gets a bit hazy to tell us when, or perhaps more importantly, how that will really happen. While we all love our technology, recent product introductions in other arenas, such as mobile devices, could be suggesting that tech just for the sake of tech, may not sell like it used to. There has to be a business case for sensing.
In this paper, we will examine ways in which the business case for rich sensing in our lights will evolve in a value-adding and logical way, from the current “occupancy only” type of sensing, into progressively more expansive sensor capabilities that will transform both the function and value of our lights. Areas to be examined include:
• The importance and payback for optical sensing within the luminaire to enable closed loop control, performance maintenance and spectral validation
• The progression of capabilities to include measurement and management of bio-active spectra, such as those affecting circadian rhythms and other physiological responses
• How horticultural lighting will pave the way for the incorporation of enhanced spectral sensing in our every-day lighting
• The inflection trigger for environmental sensing in our lights and how it will integrate into the building management strategy
• How to realize value from more detailed presence sensing, the technologies to look for, and the technology trends to watch and be ready for
• The traps to avoid, both in moving too quickly or moving too slowly
• How to recognize the transitions to new phases of adoption
• The drivers behind the coming smart lighting ecosystem, from the lamp to the cloud
We will also address the breadth of sensing technologies that we can eventually expect to see in our lights, including a discussion of how different types of evolving technologies will compete for certain sensing functions, while other technologies may provide multiple functions from a single type of sensor.